Nouveau numéro du Journal of Radio & Audio Media, avec un dossier intitulé : « Sound Matters »

img010La revue scientifique américaine : « Journal of Radio & Audio Media » propose un nouveau numéro avec un dossier spécial consacré aux recherches portant sur le son en liaison avec la radio.

Journal of Radio & Audio Media, Volume 22, Number 1, May 2015, Special Issue: Sound Matters

Table des matières et avant-propos (Editor’s Remarks, Phylis Johnson : « Sound Matters Across the World: Rehearing Radio as an Extension of Practice and Potential »)  en suivant

Journal of Radio & Audio Media, Volume 22, Number 1, May 2015, Special Issue: « Sound Matters »

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/hjrs20/current

p. 1 – Editor’s Remarks: Sound Matters Across the World: Rehearing Radio as an Extension of Practice and Potential,  Phylis Johnson

   –   INVITED ESSAYS
p. 3 – Unidentified Sounds: Radio Reporting From Copenhagen 1931-1949, Jacob Kreutzfeldt
p. 20 – A Captive Audience: Traffic Radio as Guard and Escape, Karin Bijsterveld and Marith Dieker

    –   ORIGINAL RESEARCH
p. 26 – The Double Birth of Wireless: Italian Radio Amateurs and the Interpretative Flexibility of New Media, Cabriele Balbi and Simone Natale
p. 42 – The Rise of Alternative Net Radio in Hong Kong: The Historic Case of One Pioneering Station, Dennis K. K. Leung
p. 60 – The Audience for Thailand’s Booming Community Radio System, Chalisa Magpanthong and Drew McDaniel
p. 77 – « In the World, From Our World »: Shared Values and Meanings in Transnational Participatory Radio Practice,  E. Hopke
p. 96 – Opportunities for Dialogue on Public Radio Web Sites: A Longitudinal Study, Joshua M. Bentley and Christopher C. Barnes

    –  COMMENTARY
p. 115 – Sound and Listening: Beyond the Wall of Broadcast Sound, Eric Leonardson

–   INTERVIEW
p. 122 – JRAM’s Interview With Dr. Michael C. Keith

    –  JRAM REVIEWS: Introduction Honna Veerkamp
p. 128 – Rosenthal, How Sound and Zaltzman, Sound Women
Reviewed by Cheryl Brumley
p. 131 – Steyermark, The 78 Project Movie Reviewed by Alex Kirt
p. 135 – Savage, STAR: A Psycho-topography of Place reviewed by Catherine Wilkinson
p. 137 – Hendricks and Mims, Keith’s Radio Station: Broadcast, Internet, and Satellite Reviewed by Dick Taylor
p. 140 – Grant and Stone-Davis, The Soundtrack of Conflict: The Role of Music in Radio Broadcasting in Wartime and in Conflict Situations Reviewed by Erin Yanke

***
Phylis Johnson, editor’s Remarks:
« Sound Matters Across the World: Rehearing Radio as an Extension of Practice and Potential »

In this themed issue, « Sound Matters, » we ask the reader to rehear the sounds that comprise radio, from a historical lens to the practical exercise of everyday listening and staying connected as a community of listeners. Sound is critical to every aspect of radio, programming, be it the subtle intonation of a voice to the inclusion of ambient noise at a particular site or event to the aural representation of diversity as espoused through the needs and interests of listeners living out their lives.
This issue begins with two invited essays, engaging an interesting discussion on sound and listening culture, drawn from Danish as well as Dutch, German, Belgian and United States radio broadcasts, respectively, and extending it into the larger context of radio history internationally. Often forgotten are the deep roots of what appear unique trends in contemporary radio practice. Consider that Jacob Kreutzfeldt’s « Unidentified Sounds: Radio Reporting from Copenhagen 1931-1949 » presents a unique listening opportunity from inside the Danish Broadcasting Corporation archive for some early examples of crafting and implications of sound in news stories during the 1930s. Dating back to a similar time period, Karin Bijsterveld and Marith Dieker, in « A Captive Audience: Traffic Radio as Guard and Escape, » investigate how traffic radio has had a significant role in broadcasting, and still does so today contributing to intellectual and sensory sonic navigation research and practice internationally.
The original research section takes us around the world for a variety of perspectives on radio. From Italy, Hong Kong, Thailand, Latin America to the United States, one begins to appreciate the diversity of radio, from its early models of conception to its online presence. Gabriele Balbi and Simone Natale, in « The Double Birth of Wireless: Italian Radio Amateurs and the Interpretative Flexibility of New Media, » offer a historical framework for understanding radio as re-invention (as well as media technologies, more generally), ultimately provoking speculation toward potential directions and applications in the future. Dennis K. K. Leung’s « The Rise of Alternative Net Radio in Hong Kong: The Historic Case of One Pioneering Station » depicts the short-lived legacy of the pioneering People’s Radio Hong Kong, as an illustration of the rise of alternative net radio from 2004-2007, and its continued influence on radio programming and practices challenging status quo, from political and labor issues, human rights, gay and lesbian topics, religion, to alternative subcultures and themes. In « The Audience for Thailand’s Booming Community Radio System, » Chalisa Magpanthong and Drew McDaniel, examine the phenomenal growth of this alternative type of radio in a nation that has risen as a global leader for such broadcasting. The authors present survey results of Thai radio listeners to explore the themes and significance behind the popularity of these stations. Jill E. Hopke’s  » ‘In the World, From Our World’: Shared Values and Meanings in Transnational Participatory Radio Practice, » offers a glimpse into the first decade of satellite operation of the Latin American Association of Radio Education (ALER) executive secretariat in Quito, Ecuador. Her in-depth study of ALER provides a unique perspective into alternative conceptualizations of journalistic practice, with a shared collective, transformative mission central to operation. Finally, but not least, Joshua M. Bentley and Christopher C. Barnes, in « Opportunities for Dialogue on Public Radio Web Sites: A Longitudinal Study, » share a timely, comprehensive content analysis of Web sites for 200 public radio stations so as to assess dialogue and relationship building with listeners. The results shed light on the impact of social media, but also recommend ways on improving Web site design and construction.
In the commentary section, /RAM is pleased to include Eric Leonardson’s essay « Sound and Listening: Beyond the Wall of Broadcast Sound, » which closes out nicely this issue’s theme, emphasizing the significance of a broader perspective of radio and listening that is not only timely but long overdue. Leonardson’s essay offers pause for contemplation only months away from World Listening Day, July 18, 2015.
This issue is honored to include an interview with author Michael C. Keith, the inspiration behind Keith’s Radio Station: Broadcast, Internet, and Satellite, now in its ninth edition. Keith is the author/coauthor of 30 book volumes and dozens of articles in the area of radio and broadcast studies. He is the recipient of BEA’s Lifetime Achievement in Scholarship Award and the first chair of its radio division.
The reviews section has been expanded under the care and attention of Editorial Assistant Honna Veerkamp.
On behalf of the editorial staff and contributors, I invite you to share these articles and essays with your peers inside and outside academic circles, and provoke further discussion on how we might rehear radio, not only by rethinking its history, but by reimaging how we might hear its future. Join us on Facebook and other social media platforms, and of course, annually at the Broadcast Education Association.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *